News

Q&A's

Southern District Judge Richard Berman

Meet the Judges: Southern District Judge Richard Berman

The judge discusses his philosophy about the role of a judge, how he was influenced by your pre-bench experience, and the role clerks play in running of chambers.

Howard Bressler

Q&A: Howard L. Bressler

By Jeff Storey |

Attorney Howard L. Bressler writes that in the summer of 2000, "life was good. Life was very good." Then he was diagnosed with cancer. Bressler, a special counsel at Kasowitz Benson, says that he refused to be defined by his illness. Lawyerlike, he began to research his life-threatening condition and strategies to beat it, which he writes about in "The Layman's Guide to Surviving Cancer: From Diagnosis Through Treatment and Beyond."

Judge Chen

Meet the Judges: Eastern District Judge Pamela K. Chen

Judge Chen discusses her philosophy of being a judge, her favorite aspects of the job, how her previous experience as a federal prosecutor has influenced her judicial practice, and the funniest judges in the Eastern District.

Chief Judge Carol B. Amon

Meet the Judges: Eastern District Chief Judge Carol B. Amon

The chief judge discusses her role as the chief judge, her responsibilities in administration and how she is able to balance the two.

Anthony J. Annucci

Q&A: Anthony J. Annucci

By John Caher |

To insiders in the arena of New York corrections, Anthony Annucci is the go-to guy. His appointment by Gov. Andrew Cuomo as acting commissioner was widely viewed as a no-brainer since in his decades in the field, Annucci has been at the forefront (or in the cross-hairs) of emerging issues in corrections.

Richard Emery

Q&A: Richard D. Emery

By John Caher |

When Mayor Bill de Blasio decided the much-maligned Civilian Complaint Review Board needed a major makeover, he turned to an attorney with a career-long history of taking on the establishment—both as an outsider and an insider.

Daniel Nardello

Q&A: Daniel Nardello

By Jeff Storey |

Forget the image you may have of the hard-boiled private eye waiting in a seedy office for clients to show up. A former assistant U.S. attorney who runs an independent investigative firm discusses the current state of the industry, the techniques and types of work they do, and what qualities make a good investigator.

Judge Keenan

Meet the Judges: Southern District Judge John F. Keenan

The judge discusses his approach to cases and which ones were his favorites, what he most appreciates in lawyers appearing before him, and what advice he would give to judges new to the bench.

Q&A: Robert Pigott

By Jeff Storey |

Want to know where Judge Joseph Force Crater had his last meal before disappearing forever? Robert Pigott can tell you. His just-completed book, "New York's Legal Landmarks: A Guide to Legal Edifices, Institutions, Lore, History and Curiosities on the City's Streets," is stuffed with such trivia and more momentous events besides.

Judge Castel

Meet the Judges: Southern District Judge P. Kevin Castel

Judge Castel discusses his admiration for good lawyering and what that entails, his approach to case management, why he considers the job a dream come true, and his method for keeping parties at a settlement discussion civil.

Neal Schelberg

Q&A: Neal Schelberg

By Jeff Storey |

Proskauer Rose partner Neal Schelberg describes himself as "an ERISA nuts and bolts man." He has spent most of his professional life opining on the act's requirements, and this year is chairman of the U.S. Labor Department's ERISA Advisory Council. Here he discusses ERISA, the work of the council and how issues such as same gender marriage and health care reform are impacting the employee benefits area.

Ann Pfau

Q&A: Ann T. Pfau

By John Caher |

As chief administrative judge in an unusually stormy era, Ann Pfau was renowned for her steely competence, grace under pressure and capacity to handle crisis with dignity, agility and finesse.

 Stuart Namm

Q&A: Stuart Namm

By Jeff Storey |

More than 20 years after leaving Long Island, former Suffolk County Court Judge Stuart Namm is back with a book explaining how he says he became a "pariah" and was driven from the bench after he took the unusual step of writing to Gov. Mario Cuomo with allegations of botched police investigations and manufactured testimony.

Maya Wiley

Q&A: Maya Wiley

By Rebecca Baker |

"I have the best job in City Hall," said Maya Wiley, a civil rights attorney who became Mayor Bill de Blasio's chief legal advisor two months ago. Here she discusses her legacy of activism and how she plans to be "part of the solution."