News

Q&A's

Elizabeth Cronin

Q&A: Elizabeth Cronin

By John Caher |

As a former assistant district attorney prosecuting domestic violence, child abuse, sex crimes and elder abuse cases, Elizabeth Cronin spent more than a decade bringing criminals to justice as an advocate for the "People of the State of New York." Now, as head of the Office of Victim Services, she advocates for the casualties of crime.

Acting Supreme Court Justice Alex Calabrese knows 
Red Hook. And Red Hook knows him. 
Since the Red Hook Community Justice Center opened in 2000, Calabrese has been the presiding judge of the multi-jurisdictional court, taking on juvenile delinquency cases, misdemeanors, some non-violent felonies and public housing landlord-tenant disputes, among other matters. 
He doesn’t stop there. The judge is a regular at police precinct council meetings, Little League games and other functions in a section of Brooklyn that was once notoriously crime-hardened.
Calabrese, on the bench since 1997 and a social work professor since 2004, said he gets “to see the power of the human spirit on a daily basis.”
By offering alternatives to incarceration and linking defendants with a range of social services, the problem-solving court has attracted attention over the years. But it got a new look when a nearly three-year independent study concluded in 2013 that adult misdemeanor offenders whose cases went through Red Hook were 10 percent less likely to re-offend than those whose cases were handled in the borough’s main courthouse. The Red Hook approach is estimated to have saved the system about $15 million in costs, the study found (NYLJ, Nov. 18, 2013).
The justice center, tucked inside an old schoolhouse, took the stage again in December, when newly-elected New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio chose the court as the place to announce the closely-watched appointment of his new police commissioner, William J. Bratton. The mayor said the Red Hook court  “epitomizes what I believe in, in terms of a progressive approach to public safety, bringing community and public safety professionals together.”

Q&A: Acting Supreme Court Justice Alex Calabrese

By Andrew Keshner |

Since the Red Hook Community Justice Center opened in 2000, Calabrese has been the presiding judge of the multi-jurisdictional court, but he doesn't stop there. The judge is a regular at police precinct council meetings, Little League games and other functions in a section of Brooklyn that was once notoriously crime-hardened.

Daniel Alonso

Q&A: Daniel R. Alonso

By Andrew Keshner |

The former Chief Assistant District Attorney, who is moving back to private practice after formally stepping down last month, discusses the Manhattan D.A.'s office under Cyrus Vance Jr., memorable cases, changes he saw from his first stint in the office under Robert Morgenthau 20 years ago, and changes needed in the office and the law.

Jennifer Cowan

Q&A: Jennifer R. Cowan

By Jeff Storey |

The Debevoise & Plimpton litigator led a team of lawyers who used a novel argument to secure the release of Ibrahim Idris, one of five detainees at Guantanamo Bay the firm represented, who was reunited with his family in his native Sudan in December 2013.

Justice Mark Dillon and the cover of his book,

Q&A: Justice Mark Dillon

By Jeff Storey |

The Second Department justice had not been a western history buff before a family trip to Montana. But he was intrigued by monuments and exhibits he saw on the once lawless frontier territory, an interest that eventually led to the publication of his first book, "The Montana Vigilantes: 1863-1870: Gold, Guns, and Gallows."

Q&A: Judge Jenny Rivera

By John Caher |

After a challenging nomination process, Judge Rivera has now settled in her new role on the Court of Appeals, with a series of opinions and dissents over the past 11 months that reveal an affinity for the underdog, a skepticism of government power and a commitment to individual rights.

Q&A: Michael Cardozo

By Jeff Storey |

The outgoing New York City corporation counsel discusses his tenure and approach to defending the city, changes to the Law Department over the last 12 years, tort reform, the merit selection of judges, and more.

Q&A: Allen Charne

By Andrew Keshner |

Allen Charne, the longtime executive director of the New York City Bar Legal Referral Service, has been the leader and innovator of a program that annually fields more than 75,000 calls from consumers and makes more than 23,000 referrals in matters ranging from torts to bankruptcy to matrimonial issues and beyond.

Q&A: Jane Hoffman

By Christine Simmons |

Jane Hoffman discusses the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals, which is the largest and longest running collaboration of animal rescue groups and animal shelters in the United States, its roots in the New York City Bar, and her path from Simpson Thacher associate to dedicating her career to animal welfare.

Q&A: JoAnne Page

By John Caher |

After a stint with Legal Aid and after setting up the city's first felony alternative-to-incarceration program, JoAnne Page became CEO of the Fortune Society, a reentry organization. She discusses Fortune's work, its new housing facility for previously imprisoned or homeless individuals, and her passion for social justice.

Q&A: Mark A. Berman

By Jeff Storey |

The co-chair of the new social media committee of the Commercial and Federal Litigation Section of the NYSBA, one of the first in the country, discusses the committee's work to educate attorneys about the promise and peril of social media and to have a voice in the resolution of issues that stem from its use.

Q&A: Hunter T. Carter

By Jeff Storey |

For more than a decade, business litigator Hunter T. Carter, a partner at Arent Fox, has nurtured both personal and business ties to Latin America, and to Colombia in particular.