Judith Kaye, Pathbreaking Chief Judge, Dies at 77

, New York Law Journal

   | 9 Comments

Judith Kaye, the first woman to become a judge on New York's Court of Appeals and the longest-tenured chief judge in state history, died at her home in Manhattan early Thursday.

This content has been archived. It is available exclusively through our partner LexisNexis®.

To view this content, please continue to Lexis Advance®.

Continue to Lexis Advance®

Not a Lexis Advance® Subscriber? Subscribe Now

Why am I seeing this?

LexisNexis® is now the exclusive third party online distributor of the broad collection of current and archived versions of ALM's legal news publications. LexisNexis® customers will be able to access and use ALM's content by subscribing to the LexisNexis® services via Lexis Advance®. This includes content from the National Law Journal®, The American Lawyer®, Law Technology News®, The New York Law Journal® and Corporate Counsel®, as well as ALM's other newspapers, directories, legal treatises, published and unpublished court opinions, and other sources of legal information.

ALM's content plays a significant role in your work and research, and now through this alliance LexisNexis® will bring you access to an even more comprehensive collection of legal content.

For questions call 1-877-256-2472 or contact us at customercare@alm.com

What's being said

  • Lynne Figman, Esq.

    I often ran into Justice Kaye on the Upper Westside. Last summer, I was with my mother at an outdoor cafe. Justice Kaye came over to compliment me. Mom was impressed, and I was (and still remain) in awe of such a smart and forthright human being. RIP.

  • Lynne Figman, Esq.

    I often ran into Justice Kaye on the Upper Westside. Last summer, I was with my mother at an outdoor cafe. Justice Kaye came over to compliment me. Mom was impressed, and I was (and still remain) in awe of such a smart and forthright human being. RIP.

  • Noah J. Hanft

    CPR mourns the loss of Judge Kaye. Judge Kaye dedicated her life to improving the administration of justice. An active member of CPR’s Board of Directors, she was an ardent supporter of our mission: to find better ways to resolve disputes. A consummate problem solver, Judge Kaye thoroughly deserved the national reputation she earned for both her groundbreaking decisions and her innovative reforms of the New York court system. We at CPR also knew her to be extremely warm, kind and approachable. She has left an indelible mark, and will be missed.Noah J. HanftPresident & CEO, The CPR Institute

  • Ellen B.

    Yes, I remember her as a true women‘s role model for me-- first to go to law school in DC, and then to come back to NY to work as an NY Licensed attorney at law. I never argued any cases in front of Judge Kaye, but I am sure that I will FIRST think of her when I do get to argue my first case in the NY Court of Appeals. My sympathies to the entire Kaye family and to other jurist‘s that knew and worked with her.

  • stella schindler, ret. judge, family ct

    I am bereft. She was the voice for children and families in the Courts. I will miss her personally and the Family Court has missed her and will continue to miss her.

  • Richard Friedman

    As most litigators are well aware, Justice Kaye had a tremendous positive impact on the New York judicial system and was also a wonderful speaker. Most important of all, she was a kind person. She will be sorely missed.

  • David A.

    A brilliant jurist, she will be missed.

  • Brian Graifman

    So dedicated and effective in shaping our judicial system and dispensing justice in the state. And a wonderful person.

  • Stuart Summit

    what a loss. great person. had a huge impact on justice in NYState.

Comments are not moderated. To report offensive comments, click here.

Preparing comment abuse report for Article #1202746503847

Thank you!

This article's comments will be reviewed.