Lippman Vows to Renew Push on Retirement Age

, New York Law Journal

   | 5 Comments

With the defeat of a proposed constitutional amendment that would have increased the retirement age of some judges, Governor Andrew Cuomo will likely have the opportunity to name a new chief judge and to appoint the entire Court of Appeals if he is re-elected to a second term next year.

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What's being said

  • kpatrick

    Anyone want to comment why this would be important to Lippmann?
    Is it a mortality issue ?

  • Long Island attorney

    Here's a better suggestion - one term, ten years, then you go back to the real world. This allows turnover on the bench, and will rid us of the dead wood. These machinations to protect one or two good judges from statutory senility overlook that we are stuck with the dozens of others who need to go.

  • stobey

    Chief Judge Joannthan Lippman's penchant for lobbying for constitutional amendments that would extend his stay on the bench is not only disconcerting but, in the opinion of this writer, consitutes a clear violaton of ethical codes governing judicial conduct which prohibit any judge from "lending the prestige of judicial office to advance the private interests of the judge or others" (22 NYCRR 100.2). It appears from this article that Mr. Lippman believes that Prop 6 was too complicated for the voters of this state. Such a belief seems unfounded since Prop 6 was the only referendum defeated on Tuesday. Rather than confused, the electorate issued a clear message in voting against Prop 6 which, in effect, would have transformed term appointments for all Court of Appeals judges into lifetime appointments for some, such as Mr. Lippman.

    In light of such a resounding defeat, Mr. Lippman would be well advised to abandon his focus on lobbying for amendments like Prop 6 and instead dedicate himself to improving judicial functions including, the judiciary's number one task, which is the fair and impartial adjudication of cases brought before it. The full funding of personnel charged directly with the performance of such tasks and increased staffing should be top priorities for court administrators.

  • stobey

    Chief Judge Joannthan Lippman's penchant for lobbying for constitutional amendments that would extend his stay on the bench is not only disconcerting but, in the opinion of this writer, consitutes a clear violaton of ethical codes governing judicial conduct which prohibit any judge from "lending the prestige of judicial office to advance the private interests of the judge or others" (22 NYCRR 100.2). It appears from this article that Mr. Lippman believes that Prop 6 was too complicated for the voters of this state. Such a belief seems unfounded since Prop 6 was the only referendum defeated on Tuesday. Rather than confused, the electorate issued a clear message in voting against Prop 6 which, in effect, would have transformed term appointments for all Court of Appeals judges into lifetime appointments for some, such as Mr. Lippman.

    In light of such a resounding defeat, Mr. Lippman would be well advised to abandon his focus on lobbying for amendments like Prop 6 and instead dedicate himself to improving judicial functions including, the judiciary's number one task, which is the fair and impartial adjudication of cases brought before it. The full funding of personnel charged directly with the performance of such tasks and increased staffing should be top priorities for court administrators.

  • White Plains Attorney

    We need more competent, thoughtful and fair arbitrators. There is lots of quasi-judicial work for these guys. Stop fearing change. It's inevitable. And one, single 10-14 year term is enough.

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