Experts Debate Two-Year Law School Option

, The National Law Journal

   |2 Comments

Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman stopped short of formally endorsing a proposal to allow students to take the bar exam after two years of law school when it was taken out for a public airing on Jan. 18 at NYU School of Law. But he told the more than 100 gathered legal educators, practitioners and judges that the concept deserves serious study.

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What's being said

  • Larry Cary

    So lets see, in an already dismal job market for law graduates the solution to the problem is to allow law schools to produce more law graduates by cutting the lengh of study down to two years. I see how that solves the problem!?

  • steve

    The cost of law school is a big problem. An even bigger problem is that there are roughly two law school graduates for every one legal job opening. Something needs to be done to bring graduating class sizes into alignment with employment opportunies. At the very least, the ABA should not accredit any new law schools while this situation persists.

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