An Inclusive Judiciary Is a Work in Progress

, New York Law Journal

   |1 Comments

Karen K. Peters, Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division, Third Department, writes: As both the first woman to be elected to the Supreme Court in the Third Department and the first to be appointed Presiding Justice of the Third Department, I am proud to be part of the shift towards greater diversity in New York's courts. Still, we have a long way to go before the judiciary reflects the population it serves.

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What's being said

  • Michael

    It's not the lack of diversity that make us not trust the Court System, it is the lack of ethics, morals and scruples that make us wary. Judges ignoring glaring conflicts of interest; District Attorneys allowing police officers, DNA analysts and others to 'testi-lie' and the intermingling of "DA Investigators" with police officers, all prove that the Court is neither unbiased nor free from conflict when it comes to criminal proceedings. What few minority judges there are, are scrutinized much more than their white counterparts, and if a police union or other lobbyists see a perceived error or trend, they use the media, the officers themselves and their near unexhaustable war chest to remove that judge and replace them with a lighter skinned, more police friendly jurist. Inclusive, what a joke. As George LoPresto, the dishonorable Queens County Criminal Court Judge stated to me personally "Your guilt or innocence doesn't matter". With a sitting judge having that attitude, how can we non-elite, non-rich and non-lawyers ever expect a fair trial, let alone equal treatment?

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