Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Patricia E. Salkin, Dean and Professor of Law

New York Law Journal

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According to Patricia E. Salkin, Dean and Professor of Law, a growing number of law school graduates have found intensely satisfying careers in small and solo firm practice, in the non-profit and business worlds as managers and compliance officers, and in government related fields focusing on advocacy and reform.

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What's being said

  • cvc111

    Notice the careful wording of the Dean's statement "a growing number of law school graduates have found intensely satisfying careers in small and solo firm practice, in the non-profit and business worlds as managers and compliance officers, and in government related fields focusing on advocacy and reform." Notice how she uses the wording "law school graduates." Most readers will assume that she means that a "growing" number of TOURO graduates are finding employment, but I highly doubt that is the case. If one examines the employment statistics, including those who did not find ANY position at ALL after graduation, I highly doubt that more than a few students a year (out of 200 students) are finding work in government positions, DA's offices or legal aid. When I was a student/recent graduate, only one or two TOP non-minority students (at best) found such positions. Often these students also had very close family/personal connections to the place where they were hired. Internships did not lead to hiring (no matter how hard you worked or how good your grades were). I don't doubt that the person who posted above is happy with their position in a small firm, but it is interesting to note that this person is an older student who likely has other skills/connections that made him able to function in a two person practice right out of school. For the younger person, under 25, starting out in life, Touro is not a good choice (especially if you want to be in a position to live life on your own and not depend on the charity your family for financial support). If you have other options, seriously consider them (even if it means pursuing a different career and maybe going to law school later in life).

  • JD

    I graduated from Touro in 2002. I am one of those attorneys who has a job in a small firm (one other attorney) which I find "intensely satisfying." Although I was 50 when I graduated and will be paying off the loans I accumulated while in law school for the rest of my life, I would not trade my law degree for anything. Law school gave me the tools I need to solve a wide variety of problems for our clients and I love doing it.

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