With Raise 'Too Little, Too Late,' Judge Quits

, New York Law Journal

   | 5 Comments

After years of toiling without a pay raise, Justice Ariel Belen of the Appellate Division, Second Department, yesterday confirmed that he has accepted a too-good-to-turn-down offer from JAMS and will leave the bench in mid-October.

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What's being said

  • Paul W

    If you don't like the salary, find another job. Government salaries tend to understate their true value, given the generous benefit packages, shorter work hours, and job security. The analogy to police officers fails to account for the lifespan: a judge such as Judge Ciparick can work to 70 and then go into private practice. Robert Morgenthau is 93-- not many police officers are on the beat at 93.

    The recent spate of judges (and many attorneys) whining about how poorly paid and unappreciated they are is insulting to the majority of people in this city who work a lot harder for a lot less money, in jobs not having anywhere near the social prestige.

  • Paul W

    If you don't like the salary, find another job. Government salaries tend to understate their true value, given the generous benefit packages, shorter work hours, and job security. The analogy to police officers fails to account for the lifespan: a judge such as Judge Ciparick can work to 70 and then go into private practice. Robert Morgenthau is 93-- not many police officers are on the beat at 93.

    The recent spate of judges (and many attorneys) whining about how poorly paid and unappreciated they are is insulting to the majority of people in this city who work a lot harder for a lot less money, in jobs not having anywhere near the social prestige.

  • Paul W

    If you don't like the salary, find another job. Government salaries tend to understate their true value, given the generous benefit packages, shorter work hours, and job security. The analogy to police officers fails to account for the lifespan: a judge such as Judge Ciparick can work to 70 and then go into private practice. Robert Morgenthau is 93-- not many police officers are on the beat at 93.

    The recent spate of judges (and many attorneys) whining about how poorly paid and unappreciated they are is insulting to the majority of people in this city who work a lot harder for a lot less money, in jobs not having anywhere near the social prestige.

  • Robert A

    That not a fair statement. It takes a ton of work to become a Judge and I tend to agree that dollars paid in NYC is undervalued. 168k in upstate you live quite well but in NYC I am not sure the same holds true. Very few of us would ever continue to work for 5 years let along 13 with no raise. Locally we have police officers who make that and some, calling him names for wanting a tad bit more is not really fair. One other point I am quite sure his earnings are too much to qualify for any help or assistance with his child.
    Just a thought
    ayalatax.com

  • Hadjih Bey

    This is probably the type of judge who inveighs against greedy landlords and reduces legal fees. My heart breaks for him and his fat pension and life-long medical benefits.

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